News 2021
Molecular Landscapes
07/06/2021
Guide to Understanding PDB Data: Carbohydrates
06/15/2021
Congratulations to Poster Prize Winners
06/08/2021
Education Corner: Exploring the Structure-Function Relationship
06/01/2021
How the Protein Data Bank Changed Biology
05/25/2021
Evolution of PDB-101
05/21/2021
Award-Winning Videos on Molecular Mechanisms of Drugs for Mental Disorders
05/18/2021
CellPAINT Contest Winners
05/12/2021
Vote Now for the Viewer's Choice Award
05/07/2021
Explore the History of the PDB
04/27/2021
Annual Report Published
04/24/2021
EXTENDED: Enter the 2021 CellPAINT Contest by May 6
04/24/2021
Celebrate DNA Day on April 25
04/23/2021
Register for PDB50 by May 1
04/18/2021
Scientific Software Developers and Postdocs
04/15/2021
Spring Newsletter Published
04/13/2021
Developers: HTTPS enforcement starts May 10
04/09/2021
Download Molecular Landscapes
04/06/2021
Enter the 2021 CellPAINT Contest by May 1
04/01/2021
Molecular Landscapes: E. coli
03/23/2021
Submit Abstracts for PDB50
03/07/2021
More than 1,000 SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus Protein Structures Available
03/02/2021
High School Students: Submit Videos By April 27
02/25/2021
Join Us at the Feb 24 Biophysical Society Job Fair
02/21/2021
PDB50: Submit Posters by March 15
02/15/2021
Molecular Valentines
02/11/2021
PDB50 Backgrounds For Virtual Meetings
02/02/2021
Powerful New Tools for Exploring 3D Structures
01/26/2021
Winter Newsletter Published
01/11/2021

Molecular Landscapes

07/06/2021

Whale muscles contain many myoglobin molecules (red) to store oxygen during their deep dives. This cross section shows the space between two muscle sarcomeres, which are shown at right and left with actin thin filaments in yellow and myosin thick filaments in tan. The space also includes many glycolytic enzymes and other other enzymes involved in energy production (blue) and glycogen granules (purple). A tubule of the sarcoplasmic reticulum is shown at the bottom, with many calcium pumps (blue molecules in the membrane) and calcium storage proteins (green) that concentrate calcium inside, for use in control of muscle contraction.

This painting was created as part of the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Protein Data Bank.

This painting is part of PDB-101's SciArt gallery of Molecular Landscapes by David S. Goodsell.


Guide to Understanding PDB Data: Carbohydrates

06/15/2021

Figure 2. Examples of carbohydrates in the PDB: the coronavirus spike protein (left; 7kip) with many sites of glycosylation in gray; a fragment of heparin (center; 3irl), shown with a ball-and-stick representation; and cholera toxin bound to a small fragment of O-type blood glycans (right, 5elb), with the glycans shown using SNFG representation.  <a href="https://pdb101.rcsb.org/learn/guide-to-understanding-pdb-data/exploring-carbohydrates-in-the-pdb-archive">More on carbohydrates at PDB-101.</a>Figure 2. Examples of carbohydrates in the PDB: the coronavirus spike protein (left; 7kip) with many sites of glycosylation in gray; a fragment of heparin (center; 3irl), shown with a ball-and-stick representation; and cholera toxin bound to a small fragment of O-type blood glycans (right, 5elb), with the glycans shown using SNFG representation. More on carbohydrates at PDB-101.

The constantly-growing PDB is a reflection of the research that is happening in laboratories across the world. This can make it both exciting and challenging to use the database in research and education.

PDB-101's Guide to Understanding PDB Data was created to help users navigate through the contents of the archive without having a detailed background in structural biology.

Topics cover biological assemblies, molecular graphics programs, R-value and R-free, and more.

A new chapter has been added to help users examine the carbohydrates are represented in the PDB archive. Topics in this article include:

  • General Overview
  • Importance of Carbohydrates in Biology
  • Representing Carbohydrates
  • How Carbohydrates are Specified in PDB Entries
  • Finding carbohydrates in the archive
  • The "Oligosaccharides" Section of the Structure Summary Page
  • Viewing Carbohydrates in Mol*


Congratulations to Poster Prize Winners

06/08/2021

Poster Prize awardeesPoster Prize awardees

At the inaugural PDB50 meeting, ~275 posters were presented (Abstracts Day 1 | Day 2); 209 of these presentations were considered for poster prize awards.

  • Best in High School: Nicholas Mamisashvili, Shelter Island High School, Molecular Dynamics Simulation of 6PEY.pdb a Novel Mutation in the Enzyme Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase
  • Best in Undergraduate: Ijeoma Okoye, Vassar College, X-ray and Antioxidant Determination of Butein and 2’,4’-dihydroxy-3,4-dimethoxychalcone to Examine their Antimalarial Activity by Binding to Falcipain-2
  • Best in Graduate: Daniel Sultanov, New York University, Mining for functional ribosomal variants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
  • Best in Postdoctoral Scholars: Seda Kocaman, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Different ATP binding states of the essential AAA (ATPases Associated with various Activities)-ATPase Rix7 facilitate substrate translocation in ribosome biogenesis

Many thanks to the poster prize judges:

  • BMRB: Hamid Eghbalnia
  • PDBe: Genevieve Evans, John Berrisford
  • PDBj: Genji Kurisu
  • UConn: Bing Hao, Irina Bezsonova, Melissa Caimano
  • University of Naples: Luigi Di Costanzo
  • RCSB: Brian Hudson, Brinda Vallat, Cathy Lawson, Chenghua Shao,
  • David Goodsell, Dennis Piehl, Ezra Peisach, Helen Berman, Irina Persikova, Joan Segura, Justin Flatt, Rachel Kramer Green, Stephen Burley, Yuhe Liang, Zukang Feng
  • RIT: Paul Craig

wwPDB is celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the PDB throughout 2021 with symposia, materials, and more.


Education Corner: Exploring the Structure-Function Relationship

06/01/2021

The Spring 2021 issue of the RCSB PDB Newsletter is now online.

In the Education Corner, Maria Voigt (RCSB PDB) describes Exploring the Structure-Function Relationship with Digital and Physical 3D Models of Proteins. Maria highlights PDB-101's 3D print collection that is designed to be interactive.

Other articles in this issue highlight PDB50 anniversary celebrations; the CellPAINT contest (submit images by May 1); new search tools; and more.


How the Protein Data Bank Changed Biology

05/25/2021

Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC) has published a collection of reviews in celebration of PDB50.

This issue, edited by Lila Gierasch (JBC) and Helen Berman (wwPDB Foundation, RCSB PDB), contains 17 reviews highlighting the impact of the PDB archive across biological chemistry.

JBC was one of the first journals to require PDB deposition of structural data reported in accepted articles. In addition, more structures in the PDB have been published in JBC than in any other journal.


Evolution of PDB-101

05/21/2021

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The CSD Educators Blog hosted at the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre posts stories about educational journeys and how the Cambridge Structural Database can be key to learning.

Established in 1965, the CSD is the world’s repository for small-molecule organic and metal-organic crystal structures. Containing over one million structures from x-ray and neutron diffraction analyses, this unique database of accurate 3D structures has become an essential resource to scientists and a tool for education.

The latest article in the blog series looks at Evolution of PDB-101: Molecular Explorations Through Biology and Medicine.

This year, RCSB PDB and wwPDB are celebrating the golden anniversary of the PDB with symposia, events, and related resources.

2021 marks another milestone important to RCSB PDB: the 10th anniversary of PDB-101, RCSB PDB’s online portal for teachers, students, and the general public to promote exploration in the world of proteins and nucleic acids.

Visit the CSD Educators Blog for more.


Award-Winning Videos on Molecular Mechanisms of Drugs for Mental Disorders

05/18/2021

High school students are excellent science communicators. The submitted entries in this year's Video Challenge demonstrate tremendous creativity and used many storytelling approaches to communicate the Molecular Mechanisms of Drugs for Mental Disorders.

Congratulations to the 2021 Prize Winners

  • First Place: Inhibiting Acetylcholine Destruction to Combat Alzheimer's Disease by Ethan Cartagena from Peninsula Liberty Academy, San Carlos, CA (Team advisor: Deanne Cartagena)
  • Second Place: SSRIs: Sustaining Smiles by Khushi Desai, Gabrielle Bailey, Trisha Kopparthi, and Tanvi Singh of West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South, West Windsor, NJ (Team advisor: Matthew Foret)
  • Third Place: Method in Madness: A Guide to Schizophrenia by Smita Rosemary, Rachel Yan, and Alyssa Wu of East Brunswick High School, East Brunswick, NJ (Team advisor: Anne Sanelli)
  • Viewers’ Choice: The Late Night Study Session: Derek's Depression Dream by Natasha Kulviwat, Derek Minn, and He-Hanson Xuan of Jericho High School, Jericho, NY (Team advisor: Mrs. Samantha Sforza)

Our panel of expert judges (Margaret A. Franzen (MSOE Center for BioMolecular Modeling), Steven W. Levison (New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University), and Christine D. Young (University of Illinois at Chicago) scored the videos based on Quality of Storytelling (20%), Quality of Science Communication (30%), Quality of Public Health Message (10%), Originality and Creativity (20%), Quality of Production (10%), and Proper Accreditation (10%).

The general public voted for the Viewer's Choice Award.

Many thanks to the expert judges, students, teachers, parents, and voters who made this exciting competition happen!


CellPAINT Contest Winners

05/12/2021

CellPAINT can be used to create drawing pictures of cellular and viral systems. The Scripps Research Center for Computational Structural Biology (CCSB) in association with RCSB PDB hosted an coronavirus image contest created using CellPAINT in the categories of PDB50 and vaccines.

Best in Celebrating PDB

Happy 50th birthday to PDB! by Irina Bezsonova (University of Connecticut).Happy 50th birthday to PDB! by Irina Bezsonova (University of Connecticut).

Best in Celebrating Vaccines

COVID-19 may keep us distanced, but we can still celebrate! Our immune system is our natural defense system, and vaccines will strengthen us (Kirsten Fertuck, Northeastern University)<P>COVID-19 may keep us distanced, but we can still celebrate! Our immune system is our natural defense system, and vaccines will strengthen us (Kirsten Fertuck, Northeastern University)

Many thanks to everyone who participated.


Vote Now for the Viewer's Choice Award

05/07/2021

RCSB PDB challenged high school students to create short videos that tell stories about the Molecular Mechanisms of Drugs for Mental Disorders.

Watch the challenge entries online and cast your vote for your favorite video by May 10.

Award winners will be announced on RCSB.org and PDB101.rcsb.org on May 18, 2021.


Explore the History of the PDB

04/27/2021

Throughout 2021, the wwPDB will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the PDB archive (see wwpdb.org/pdb50 and rcsb.org/pdb50).

Explore a historical overview of the PDB, including a timeline that tracks highlights from the PDB and the structural biology community.


Annual Report Published

04/24/2021

Download the 2020 Annual Report (PDF) for an overview of recent Deposition/Biocuration, Archive Management/Access, Data Exploration, and Outreach/Education activities.

This review highlights many RCSB PDB accomplishments, PDB structures and the pandemic, and celebrating 50 years of the PDB archive.

These bulletins provide a yearly snapshot of RCSB PDB activities and the state of the PDB archive.


EXTENDED: Enter the 2021 CellPAINT Contest by May 6

04/24/2021

Show us illustrations inspired by vaccines and by 50 years of the PDB coronavirus with a new version of CellPAINT. The Scripps Research Center for Computational Structural Biology (CCSB) in association with RCSB PDB is hosting an image contest. There are two categories: Science of Vaccines and 50 Years of PDB.

Images for the <B><I>Science of Vaccines</I></B> category need to be accurate and present aspects of structure and biology--create something that helps us understand vaccines and how they work.Images for the Science of Vaccines category need to be accurate and present aspects of structure and biology--create something that helps us understand vaccines and how they work.
In the <B><I>50 Years of PDB</I></B> category, let your creativity run wild with any topic that celebrates 50 years of access to biological macromolecules in the Protein Data Bank archive--create something that amazes and inspires.In the 50 Years of PDB category, let your creativity run wild with any topic that celebrates 50 years of access to biological macromolecules in the Protein Data Bank archive--create something that amazes and inspires.

Suggested resources include Molecule of the Month articles on Adenovirus, Human Papillomavirus and Vaccines, and Measles Virus Proteins; Resources to Fight the COVID-19 Pandemic: SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine and Passive Immunization with Convalescent Antibodies; mRNA vaccines - a new era in vaccinology (Nat Rev Drug Discov 2018); and PDB-101 resources on viruses.

Suggested resources include PDB50 materials, Structural Biology and Nobel Prizes, and Molecule of the Month articles on PDB Pioneers and Twenty Years of Molecules.

For this contest, you can submit images created using the web-based program or the stand-alone version.

A CellPAINT tutorial provides information on how to create images using the program.

Information about new molecules added to CellPAINT for drawing illustrations of mRNA vaccines like the ones being used to fight COVID-19 is available.

Contest Overview

  • The contest is open to all, with one entry per person in each category.
  • Submitted should be still images submitted in a familiar format (jpg, tiff, etc), that use CellPAINT in some or all of the image creation.
  • The contest will be judged by members of the CCSB and RCSB PDB.
  • Participants are encouraged to share their entries online with the hashtags #VaccinesByCellPAINT or #CelebratePDB, but need to submit using the online form to be considered.

Submit by May 7, 2021

Option 1: I have a Google Account

Option 2: I don't have a Google account


Winners of each category will be awarded:

A set of PDB-themed cards created by David S. Goodsell.A set of PDB-themed cards created by David S. Goodsell.

CellPAINT

CellPAINT is software for drawing pictures of cellular and viral systems, similar to a traditional digital paint program. The shapes and sizes of molecules are based on atomic structures taken from the Protein Data Bank, and the program allows you to build membranes, add membrane-bound proteins, and fill the inside and outside with soluble proteins and other molecules (more information).

About the RCSB PDB and PDB-101

RCSB.org enables breakthroughs in scientific and biomedical research and education through tools and resources built on top of the PDB archive of 3D proteins and nucleic acids. RCSB PDB and the wwPDB are celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the PDB with symposia, materials, and more.


Celebrate DNA Day on April 25

04/23/2021

DNA Day commemorates the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 and the discovery of DNA's double helix in 1953. Celebrate by:

DNA and RNA are the cell’s way of storing and deploying genetic information. Structural biology is revealing that some nucleic acids also fold to form complex molecular machines. Guided by these structures, nanotech scientists are building new machines composed of nucleic acid. <a href="http://pdb101.rcsb.org/browse/nucleic-acids">Learn more at PDB-101</a>DNA and RNA are the cell’s way of storing and deploying genetic information. Structural biology is revealing that some nucleic acids also fold to form complex molecular machines. Guided by these structures, nanotech scientists are building new machines composed of nucleic acid. Learn more at PDB-101


Register for PDB50 by May 1

04/18/2021

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Throughout 2021, the wwPDB will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the PDB archive (wwpdb.org/pdb50).

The inaugural symposium will be held virtually on May 4-5, 2021.

The online sessions will take place between 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. ET each day. The event will be recorded and made available to registered participants after the meeting.

Students and postdoctoral fellows are especially encouraged to attend and will be eligible for poster awards.

Register by May 1 at https://www.asbmb.org/meetings-events/pdb50.

Speakers

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Scientific Software Developers and Postdocs

04/15/2021

Join RCSB PDB to design, develop, & deploy modern web and data applications & complex user interfaces. Help accelerate research and training in biology, medicine, & related disciplines. Positions at Rutgers and SDSC/UCSD.

RCSB PDB team pictured at the January 2020 <I>Cloud Technologies Best Practices</I> hosted by the Institute for Quantitative Biomedicine at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.RCSB PDB team pictured at the January 2020 Cloud Technologies Best Practices hosted by the Institute for Quantitative Biomedicine at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.


Spring Newsletter Published

04/13/2021

The Spring 2021 issue of the RCSB PDB Newsletter is now online.

This issue highlights PDB50 anniversary celebrations; the CellPAINT contest (submit images by May 1); new search tools; and more.

The Education Corner by RCSB PDB's Maria Voigt Explores the Structure-Function Relationship with Digital and Physical 3D Models of Proteins.

Sign up to receive electronic updates each quarter.


Developers: HTTPS enforcement starts May 10

04/09/2021

RCSB PDB APIs, RCSB.org, and PDB101.rcsb.org will enforce use of the secure HTTPS protocol starting May 10, 2021. HTTP Strict Transport Security headers will be implemented.

RCSB.org data and services have supported supported HTTPS protocol since 2017, but with this change all users will be redirected to HTTPS to guarantee secure communication.

Programmatic users are encouraged to switch to HTTPS as soon as possible. Not all HTTP clients will necessarily follow redirects automatically.

Individual website users should not be impacted, as modern web browsers will redirect automatically.


Download Molecular Landscapes

04/06/2021

Acknowledgement: David S. Goodsell, RCSB Protein Data Bank doi: <a href="http://pdb101.rcsb.org/sci-art/goodsell-gallery/respiratory-droplet">10.2210/rcsb_pdb/goodsell-gallery-024</a>Acknowledgement: David S. Goodsell, RCSB Protein Data Bank doi: 10.2210/rcsb_pdb/goodsell-gallery-024

This painting by David S. Goodsell shows a cross section through a small respiratory droplet, like the ones that are thought to transmit SARS-CoV-2. The virus is shown in magenta, and the droplet is also filled with molecules that are present in the respiratory tract, including mucins (green), pulmonary surfactant proteins and lipids (blue), and antibodies (tan). The painting was created as part of the show New Ways of Living with SciCommMake.

Goodsell's molecular landscapes are available from PDB-101 in a special SciArt Digital Archive. These watercolor paintings integrate information from structural biology, microscopy and biophysics to simulate detailed views of the molecular structure of living cells. These illustrations are free for use under CC-BY-4.0 license. Acknowledgement should be given as indicated for each illustration.


Enter the 2021 CellPAINT Contest by May 1

04/01/2021

Show us illustrations inspired by vaccines and by 50 years of the PDB coronavirus with a new version of CellPAINT. The Scripps Research Center for Computational Structural Biology (CCSB) in association with RCSB PDB is hosting an image contest. There are two categories: Science of Vaccines and 50 Years of PDB.

Images for the <B><I>Science of Vaccines</I></B> category need to be accurate and present aspects of structure and biology--create something that helps us understand vaccines and how they work.Images for the Science of Vaccines category need to be accurate and present aspects of structure and biology--create something that helps us understand vaccines and how they work.
In the <B><I>50 Years of PDB</I></B> category, let your creativity run wild with any topic that celebrates 50 years of access to biological macromolecules in the Protein Data Bank archive--create something that amazes and inspires.In the 50 Years of PDB category, let your creativity run wild with any topic that celebrates 50 years of access to biological macromolecules in the Protein Data Bank archive--create something that amazes and inspires.

Suggested resources include Molecule of the Month articles on Adenovirus, Human Papillomavirus and Vaccines, and Measles Virus Proteins; Resources to Fight the COVID-19 Pandemic: SARS-CoV-2 mRNA Vaccine and Passive Immunization with Convalescent Antibodies; mRNA vaccines - a new era in vaccinology (Nat Rev Drug Discov 2018); and PDB-101 resources on viruses.

Suggested resources include PDB50 materials, Structural Biology and Nobel Prizes, and Molecule of the Month articles on PDB Pioneers and Twenty Years of Molecules.

For this contest, you can submit images created using the web-based program or the stand-alone version.

A CellPAINT tutorial provides information on how to create images using the program.

Information about new molecules added to CellPAINT for drawing illustrations of mRNA vaccines like the ones being used to fight COVID-19 is available.

Contest Overview

  • The contest is open to all, with one entry per person in each category.
  • Submitted should be still images submitted in a familiar format (jpg, tiff, etc), that use CellPAINT in some or all of the image creation.
  • The contest will be judged by members of the CCSB and RCSB PDB.
  • Participants are encouraged to share their entries online with the hashtags #VaccinesByCellPAINT or #CelebratePDB, but need to submit using the online form to be considered.

Submit by May 1, 2021

Option 1: I have a Google Account

Option 2: I don't have a Google account


Winners of each category will be awarded:

A set of PDB-themed cards created by David S. Goodsell.A set of PDB-themed cards created by David S. Goodsell.

CellPAINT

CellPAINT is software for drawing pictures of cellular and viral systems, similar to a traditional digital paint program. The shapes and sizes of molecules are based on atomic structures taken from the Protein Data Bank, and the program allows you to build membranes, add membrane-bound proteins, and fill the inside and outside with soluble proteins and other molecules (more information).

About the RCSB PDB and PDB-101

RCSB.org enables breakthroughs in scientific and biomedical research and education through tools and resources built on top of the PDB archive of 3D proteins and nucleic acids. RCSB PDB and the wwPDB are celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the PDB with symposia, materials, and more.


Molecular Landscapes: E. coli

03/23/2021

A new painting by David S. Goodsell illustrates a cross-section through an Escherichia coli cell. The image is available for download from the Molecular Landscapes SciArt Gallery.

This painting is an update of an earlier E. coli painting from 1999, incorporating abundant new data that has been gathered since then, including proteomics information and many amazing new structures.

Goodsell's molecular landscapes are available from PDB-101 in a special SciArt Digital Archive. These watercolor paintings integrate information from structural biology, microscopy and biophysics to simulate detailed views of the molecular structure of living cells. These illustrations are free for use under CC-BY-4.0 license. Acknowledgement should be given as indicated for each illustration.


Submit Abstracts for PDB50

03/07/2021

Throughout 2021, RCSB PDB and the wwPDB will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the PDB archive (wwpdb.org/pdb50 and wwpdb.org/pdb50).

The inaugural symposium will be held virtually on May 4-5, 2021.

The online sessions will take place between 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. ET each day. The event will be recorded and made available to registered participants after the meeting.

Students and postdoctoral fellows are especially encouraged to attend and will be eligible for poster awards.

Abstract submission and reduced registration rates end March 15.
Register at https://www.asbmb.org/meetings-events/pdb50.

Speakers

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More than 1,000 SARS-CoV-2 Coronavirus Protein Structures Available

03/02/2021

With this week's update, 1,018 SARS-CoV-2-related structures are now freely available from the Protein Data Bank.

The first SARS-CoV-2 structure, a high-resolution crystal structure of the coronavirus main protease (PDB 6lu7), was released early in the pandemic on February 5, 2020.

Since then, structural biologists have visualized most of the SARS-CoV-2 proteome, including the spike protein binding to its ACE2 receptor and neutralizing antibodies, and the main protease, the papain-like proteinase, and other promising drug discovery targets. All of the structures and related data are available for exploration from wwPDB partner websites: RCSB PDB, PDBe, PDBj, and BMRB.

Rapid public release of SARS-CoV-2 structure data has greatly increased our understanding of Covid-19, allowed direct visualization of emerging variants of the virus, and facilitated structure-guided drug discovery and reuse to combat infection. Open access to PDB structures has already enabled design of effective vaccines against SARS-CoV-2.

The response of the research community to the pandemic has highlighted the importance of open access to scientific data in real time. The wwPDB strives to ensure that 3D biological structure data remain freely accessible for all, while maintaining as comprehensive and accurate an archive as possible.

The impact of these 1018 structures and many more coronavirus protein structures to come stands as a testament to the importance of open access to structural biology research data.

Illustration by David S. Goodsell, RCSB Protein Data Bank; doi: <a href="http://pdb101.rcsb.org/sci-art/goodsell-gallery/respiratory-droplet">10.2210/rcsb_pdb/goodsell-gallery-024</a>. <BR><a href="http://pdb101.rcsb.org/browse/coronavirus">Visit PDB-101 for related educational materials.</a>Illustration by David S. Goodsell, RCSB Protein Data Bank; doi: 10.2210/rcsb_pdb/goodsell-gallery-024.
Visit PDB-101 for related educational materials.


High School Students: Submit Videos By April 27

02/25/2021

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The brain orchestrates everything we do, sending signals through the nervous system to control different parts of our body. The brain is also the home of our thoughts and consciousness, as neurons process the input from our senses and store what they find as memories. Sometimes this input is not processed right. This can be modulated by the drugs prescribed by the doctors to amplify or to soften the neuronal signal.

High school students can help increase awareness by participating in the 2021 Video Challenge for High School Students on Molecular Mechanisms of Drugs for Mental Disorders.

Submit your entry on or before April 27, 2021. Visit PDB-101 for contest details, resources, guidelines, and the panel of expert judges.


Join Us at the Feb 24 Biophysical Society Job Fair

02/21/2021

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Meet with team members to learn about open positions for Scientific Software Developers (Rutgers and UCSD), Postdoctoral Researchers (UCSD), and summer undergraduate researchers (virtually at Rutgers).

RCSB PDB is a world-renowned, scientific organization focused on serving technical, educational and other programmatic needs of scientific and research communities worldwide. RCSB.org serves millions of users in academia and industry. The RCSB PDB development team, located at UCSD/SDSC and Rutgers, creates leading edge web technologies targeted for scientific and educational audiences.

Join the RCSB PDB and participate in exciting projects with significant impact on the scientific community.

Can't attend the fair? Please Contact Us with any questions.

RCSB PDB Team in 2020RCSB PDB Team in 2020
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PDB50: Submit Posters by March 15

02/15/2021

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Throughout 2021, the wwPDB will be celebrating the 50th anniversary of the PDB archive.

The inaugural symposium will be held May 4-5, 2021 in an event hosted by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and organized by the wwPDB Foundation.

This celebration of the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Protein Data Bank as the first open access digital data resource in biology will include presentations from speakers from around the world who have made tremendous advances in structural biology and bioinformatics.

Attendees are encouraged to participate in the virtual poster session and exhibition hall. Students and postdoctoral fellows will be eligible for poster awards.

Register and submit abstracts by March 15th, 2021 for reduced rates.

Speakers will include:

  • Edward Arnold - Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Helen M. Berman - Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and University of Southern California
  • Thomas L. Blundell - University of Cambridge
  • Alexandre M. J. J. Bonvin - Utrecht University
  • Stephen K. Burley - Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and University of California San Diego
  • Wah Chiu - Stanford University
  • Johann Deisenhofer - University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
  • Juli Feigon - University of California Los Angeles
  • Angela M. Gronenborn - University of Pittsburgh
  • Jennifer L. Martin - University of Wollongong
  • Stephen L. Mayo - California Institute of Technology
  • Zihe Rao - ShanghaiTech University and Tsinghua University
  • Hao Wu - Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School

The online sessions will take place between 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST each day. The event will be recorded and made available to registered participants after the meeting.

Sponsorship opportunities are available; please contact the wwPDB Foundation for more information.


Molecular Valentines

02/11/2021

Click on each image to expand.



PDB50 Backgrounds For Virtual Meetings

02/02/2021

The wwPDB created a 2021 calendar to celebrate the PDB's golden anniversary.

Each month's image is available to be used as a virtual meeting background.

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The inaugural symposium will be held May 4-5, 2021 in an event hosted by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and organized by the wwPDB Foundation. The online sessions will take place between 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST each day. The event will be recorded and made available to registered participants after the meeting.

Attendees are encouraged to participate in the virtual poster session and exhibition hall. Students and postdoctoral fellows will be eligible for poster awards.

Register and submit abstracts by March 15th, 2021 for reduced rates.


Powerful New Tools for Exploring 3D Structures

01/26/2021

A new article in Nucleic Acids Research uses SARS-CoV-2 structures to demonstrate redesigned RCSB.org features for exploring structural data.

RCSB Protein Data Bank: powerful new tools for exploring 3D structures of biological macromolecules for basic and applied research and education in fundamental biology, biomedicine, biotechnology, bioengineering and energy sciences
Nucleic Acids Research (2021) 49: D437–D451 doi: 10.1093/nar/gkaa1038

This tutorial and overview of the latest RCSB.org tools appears in the annual Database Issue of Nucleic Acids Research.

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Winter Newsletter Published

01/11/2021

The Winter 2021 issue of the RCSB PDB Newsletter is now online.

This issue highlights PDB50 anniversary celebrations; 2020 statistics; new search tools; Biocurator explores SARS-CoV-2 in VR; and more.

The Education Corner describes the 2020 ACA Transactions Symposium on Structural Science: New Ways to Teach the Next Generation.

Sign up to receive electronic updates each quarter.


Past news and events have been reported at the RCSB PDB website and past Newsletters.

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